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Planned sinking of artificial reef in Canada in ‘final stages’ despite staunch opposition

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annapolis

CANADA – British Columbia’s Artificial Reef Society has said that it is in the final stages of preparation to sink HMCS Annapolis in Halkett Bay Provincial Marine Park off Gambier Island in Howe Sound.

But groups opposing the plan to sink the decommissioned destroyer say the reef society is getting ahead of itself as there are legal and environmental issues that have yet to be resolved.

The project has faced opposition since 2008 from the Save Halkett Bay Marine Park Society and Georgia Strait Alliance and has also faced financial challenges. The ship was even seized by the court at one point over a dispute with the company mooring it.

“Throughout all that difficulty, we navigated successfully to where we are right now through careful planning and adhering to the rules and regulations and being fully compliant and even exceeding the standards with the government to the extent that we’re now fully permitted,” said Howard Robbins, the Artificial Reef Society’s president. “We’re hoping to get it down before the end of January.”

When the time comes, the 113-metre vessel will be towed into place and anchored to concrete blocks before specially designed explosive charges will punch square holes in the hull allowing it to sink about 32 metres to the seafloor.

Once inspections have been carried out, the Annapolis will be available to be explored by qualified divers who it’s hoped will document the various species that move into the wreck in a citizen-based science project called the Annapolis Biodiversity Index Study.

But the Save Halkett Bay group hired an independent lab in November to take a paint sample from the hull, which was tested and shown to contain tributylin, a toxic anti-fouling agent designed to prevent sea life from growing on ship hulls. It was banned by the United Nations’ International Maritime Organization in 2008 and by the Canadian government in 2009.

“It doesn’t actually matter what the quantity is because it’s a substance that’s not allowed to be disposed of, especially at sea,” said Save Halkett Bay spokesman Gary MacDonald. “We simply don’t understand why the Artificial Reef Society isn’t pausing and really checking to make sure the ship is clean.”

Robbins, however, said he questions the validity of the Save Halkett Bay group’s testing and that he will defer to Environment Canada, which has the final say on the project. “We follow Environment Canada’s rules. They’re the ones that set the standards and they’re the ones that have certified the ship as ready to go and clean for the environment,” he said. “The remaining opposition is simply NIMBYism masking itself as environmentalism.”

Save Halkett Bay is now formally asking Environment Canada for a board of review to re-evaluate the Annapolis’s permit and for a full independent inspection of all the materials aboard the destroyer. The group is also awaiting a response to its court petition to stop the sinking. The petition filed in B.C. Supreme Court in October cites the project’s failure to comply with provincial park regulations. The petition also cites other groups that have opposed the sinking, including the Islands Trust, on the grounds that sinking the ship would violate its land use bylaws and the United Church of Canada because it owns a campground on Halkett Bay where kids go canoeing and swimming.

Much of the controversy over the project has been misplaced, according to Jeff Marliave, vice-president of marine science at the Vancouver Aquarium and an independent arbiter on the project. “The seafloor in the area where Annapolis will be sunk was permanently damaged by layers of Douglas fir bark piling up during log booming years,” he said. “I think, in all, this is a very safe place to put down a feature that will become a very safe dive site.”

Marliave added that the ship will create new habitat and will prevent divers from damaging natural reefs. “I would predict from what we know about Halkett Bay that we’re going to be seeing glass sponges and rock fish and all kinds of things,” he said.

 

Source: www.nsnews.com

 

Dive Training Blogs

Deptherapy returns to its Roots – Part 3

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Join Richard Cullen from Deptherapy as we publish part 3 in his Blog about the charity’s recent expedition to Roots Red Sea, El Quseir, Egypt.

Today was planned to be our first day of open water diving in the Red Sea on the Roots’ House Reef. The Dive Centre and the House Reef are literally a 5-minute walk from the camp.  If some beneficiaries are unable to make the walk then transport is provided.

All your kit, weights, cylinders etc are laid out ready for you to assemble your kit.

For those who use wheelchairs there is a paving stone pathway from the dive centre to the entry point for the reef. This, as with the provision of four fully accessible rooms in the resort, was built by Steve Rattle and his team to meet Deptherapy’s needs and to make the resort and reef accessible to all divers with disabilities.

A point here: in many Adaptive Teaching/Disabled Diving Manuals it is suggested that dive centres might wish to purchase a beach wheelchair.  To justify the cost, you would need a considerable number of disabled clients who were unable to walk to the ocean entry point as they cost circa £3000.  Using an individual’s wheelchair across sandy beaches is difficult and not a good idea. Many wheelchairs, such as Corey’s, cost thousands of pounds and getting sand/grit in the bearings can result in costly repairs.  So, at Roots the staff have adapted and overcome the challenge, with the beach wheelbarrow.  A foam pad is placed in the bottom and a towel draped over it.  It is effective and allows divers like Corey to be taken to the beach, the wheelbarrow is pushed into shallow water and the diver either gets out of the transport himself or is lifted out by the Roots team.  Everyone finds it a lot of fun!

Your transport awaits!

Working with those with life-changing mental and/or physical challenges does require careful risk management, not just in the general risk models for groups of divers but individual risk assessments.

On the Deptherapy Education Professionals’ Course and adopted in all our programmes is the ‘Three Tick Model’. Before taking an individual diving, each of the following must be ticked off:

  • Doctor certifies student fit to dive
  • Student signs assumption of Liability and Risks
  • Instructor is happy given the medical information to instruct the student.

As an Instructor, or as a dive centre owner you may wish to check that your insurance covers you for working with those with severe disabilities.

The instructor will meet with the student and complete a personalised risk assessment and will review whether there have been any changes in the student’s physical or mental health since their consultation with their doctor (in our case an AMED or Dive Referee).  They will also check that the medication or its daily dosage has not changed.

In terms of those with severe challenges, an AMED or a Dive Referee may require full disclosure of medical records before making a decision.  For Deptherapy we also reserve the right to refer a final decision to our two medical advisors, Dr Mark Downs or Dr Oli Firth, both of whom have considerable experience in dive medicine.

At the end of Day 1 the team were happy for Keiron to move forward; he is a strong, fit man and a capable diver who gives 100%.  Corey is an amazing guy and was very quickly embraced as a member of the Deptherapy ‘family’. But sometimes there has to be tough love and in Deptherapy we are always very open with our beneficiaries.  Some reach a level of certification beyond which they cannot progress.  For Corey there was a serious discussion with the teaching team. He had completed his skills in the pool and met the standard required BUT none of us, especially me, had any confidence that he was the standard to be an Open Water Diver.  A hard message to give to a young man who already had a certification card that said he was an Open Water Diver.  He had either not been taught properly and certified without having met the required standards or he had forgotten all he had learned.  My view is he is a bright young man and that the former reason must be correct.

Corey, Keiron and Swars between confined dives by the Roots pool

The RAID definition of mastery:

When a student/learner can comfortably demonstrate proficiency and competence, when completing an entire motor skill including all the components of the skill in a manner that demonstrates minimal stress or hesitation.’

Each mainstream diving training agency defines mastery in similar terms. It was not Corey’s ability to do the skills, it was his ability to ‘dive’ that concerned us.

If weather conditions are right, the Roots House Reef meets the requirements for a ‘confined environment’ and on Day 3 it did.

Entry to the reef is through a channel and it goes from extremely shallow to 3-5 metres.  There is a rope that allows a diver to control their descent and for use at the end of a dive if the current is running.

Most instructors will have seen nervous divers who say they have ear issues, not at a depth when there is any noticeable change in pressure, and those who continually fidget with their masks and other kit in an attempt to avoid descent. Corey displayed these traits.

We made the decision to move to the open water as it would give Corey more of an opportunity to get himself in a horizontal position rather than the upright position we saw in the pool.  We struggled to get him down the line and into the sea.  Eventually after much hard work we got there.  He maintained the upright position and was using tiny arm and hand movements to propel himself forward.  His buoyancy was poor.  We decided to end this session and return to the pool.

A note here on trim and posture in the water for both amputees and those with paraplegia.  When working with a leg amputee, especially a bilateral amputee, their balance at the surface is often poor, they tip forward, backwards and from side to side. This is often to do with weighting but also the fact that they do not have legs to weigh them down or to balance them.  They also are often unaware of where their stumps (the term for the part of the limb remaining) are, and their stumps come up at right angles to their body.  We have exercises to make amputees aware of this.

Those with paraplegia adopt a different stance, often they are upright in the water and their legs trail down, even when in trim their legs hang below the rest of their body.  The team needs to ensure that the diver is properly weighted and that the horizontal position in the water in reinforced.  Spatial awareness also needs to be created in the diver so that their legs and feet do not drag along the bottom or come into contact with coral.  They need to become aware of where their legs and feet are in the water.

This was very hard for Corey and I was quite honest that he needed to improve considerably and learn to dive properly before I would allow him to move forward. He was gutted but up for the challenge, and what we saw over the next few days was a man committed to succeed!

Michael and Keiron

So back to the pool with Oatsie and Michael. We went through all the skills for RAID OW20 twice and focussed on buoyancy, performing the skills neutrally buoyant, getting Corey in trim and teaching him how to swim underwater without the use of his legs.  It is a pity that Chris Middleton, one of our divemasters and a bilateral amputee had to miss the expedition because of wisdom tooth surgery. Chris is a role model of how to swim underwater without the use of your legs.

Although I, all our Instructors and our DMs/TDMs can demonstrate how to swim underwater, not using your legs and using a modified free diving stroke, it is far better for someone with no legs or no use of their legs to demonstrate the skill.

By the end of the day Corey had progressed substantially and the Red Sea awaited him on Day 4.

Keiron had progressed well with his instructor Moudi and Swars and was getting added value with extra work on advanced buoyancy and SMB and DSMB deployment.

Tomorrow I will talk a little more about our TDMs; we expect very high standards from them.  Michael and the two Toms have over 100 dives each. Michael dived with us in Chuuk Lagoon and both Toms have been on Red Sea liveaboards. We look for them to go beyond DM level and to progress to Instructor level.  Swars had delayed the start of his DM programme, initially because of work and then COVID. He impressed, and here again, veterans have some advantages as they are used to briefings and therefore when you give them a model for a briefing they can quickly pull a high quality briefing together.

RAID Skill Briefing Checklist and OW20 slates

Throughout the week I found the RAID skills briefing slate excellent for the TDMs and the plastic skills slates are a great aide memoire for the whole team.


Find out more about the work of Deptherapy and Deptherapy Education at www.deptherapy.co.uk

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Marine Life & Conservation

Join Reef-World’s sustainability webinar at the first ever Scuba.Digital

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Join Reef-World and a panel of industry experts at the first ever Scuba.Digital for an open discussion on green tourism and how this might be shaped by a post-corona world.

 The Reef-World Foundation – the international coordinator of the UN Environment Programme’s Green Fins initiative – is pleased to invite its supporters to its Sustainable Diving event on the main stage of Scuba.Digital 2020 (3pm BST on Friday 23 October 2020). At this virtual Q&A, members of the public will hear from industry leaders about the steps they’re taking towards sustainability, particularly in light of the current pandemic.

The Covid-19 pandemic has changed plans and caused uncertainty across the dive industry: not least when it comes to sustainability. It has also led to a surge in the volume of plastic waste – particularly from single-use and hard-to-recycle products – with masks and gloves being found washed up on beaches. So, what now for green tourism? In this session, attendees will discover the unexpected environmental challenges that have been caused by the pandemic, how sustainability leaders are overcoming those obstacles and the simple changes YOU can make to protect coral reefs for future generations.

Reef-World and the United Nations Environment Programme will host a lively virtual discussion with PADI, Explorer Ventures Liveaboard Fleet, Scuba.Digital, Paralenz, ZuBlu and Bubbles Dive Centre. Together, they will talk about how the sustainability of the diving industry has been impacted by Covid-19 and predictions for the future of green tourism. Attendees will learn:

  • Why is coral so important and how they can be protected through sustainable diving practices
  • What sustainability leaders across the industry are doing to protect coral reefs
  • And how they’ve adjusted their plans in light of the current pandemic
  • What the future of sustainable tourism might look like, according to the expert panel
  • & the simple changes YOU can make to protect coral reefs for future generations.

The panel discussion will be available to watch on the Scuba.Digital main stage at 3-3.30pm and 4-4.30pm BST (with a short break in between the two sessions) on Friday 23 October 2020. Attendees will be able to submit their own questions to the panel too.

Chloe Harvey, Director at The Reef-World Foundation, said: “Reef-World’s sustainable diving events have been gaining momentum in previous years so we’re delighted to be able to host this exciting panel event despite current travel restrictions. While the pandemic is causing challenges across the industry, it also offers the opportunity for us to pause, regroup and plan to build back better with a more sustainable tourism industry. We must act now to protect our coral reefs – the very asset upon which our industry depends – and we must work together. So, we’re thrilled to be shining a light on the future of sustainability and help both recreational and professional divers around the world understand how they can support the cause.”

Natalie Harms, Marine Litter Focal Point, COBSEA Secretariat, UNEP – who will be chairing the event – said: “This crisis is hitting marine tourism and the people who depend on it hard. It has showed us once more that our health and the health of our ecosystems are inextricably linked. There is no silver lining for nature – now more than ever the diving community can lead by example and join hands for a sound environmental response to the crisis.”

The 2020 panel represent a range of companies who are innovating when it comes to sustainability:

Reef-World – the leader in marine tourism sustainability – aims to make sustainable diving and snorkelling the social norm.

The UN Environment Programme – the leading authority setting the global environmental agenda, which provides technical advice, support and funding for Reef-World’s Green Fins programme

Scuba.Digital – run by the team at ScubaClick Ltd – was created to help the diving industry network, collaborate and innovate in a way that won’t be affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

PADI – The world’s largest diving organisation made a proclamation for the planet in 2019: shifting its brand tagline to “Seek Adventure. Save the Ocean” in order to expand its mission to include a deeper commitment to taking action to protect people and planet.

Explorer Ventures Liveaboard Fleet – is enhancing environmental operations through a customised management strategy, starting with its Caribbean vessels. It is also helping The Reef-World Foundation establish targeted liveaboard protocols as part of the Green Fins initiative with the hope of improving dive operator and liveaboard policies worldwide.

ZuBlu – is a travel platform helping scuba divers and marine enthusiasts discover and book their next underwater adventure in Asia

Paralenz – has developed a camera that enable divers to capture and share the state and life of the Ocean as a seamless part of the dive

Bubbles Dive Centre – in Pulau Perhentian, Malaysia, is one of the global Top 10 Green Fins members.

This online panel event is relevant to representatives from all segments of the diving industry: recreational divers, dive professionals, dive operators, liveaboards, resorts, travel providers, diver training organisations, manufacturers, photographers, the media and more.

Jason Haiselden, Marketing & Sales Director at ScubaClick Ltd and Scuba.Digital, said: “It is great that Reef-World has grabbed the opportunity that Scuba.Digital presents to tell the industry and the diving and snorkelling public how they can make what we do more sustainable. Covid is forcing change upon us so why not take the opportunity to make sustainable changes.”

For more information, please visit www.reef-world.org / www.greenfins.net or come and meet The Reef-World Foundation team at Scuba.Digital.

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