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Fluro diving: have you ever heard of it?

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The next in an exciting new series of blogs introducing some of the amazing marine life you can encounter at Magic Resorts in the Philippines…

Fluro diving has been around for quite a few years now but it is still not really common. On the internet you can find loads of information about fluorescence and how it’s achieved, but still doesn’t really answer the questions about what a fluro dive is.

Here at Magic Island, we have a lot of guests who never heard of it before, and yet it’s such an incredible experience!


Read on and learn everything you need to know about fluro diving and why you shouldn’t miss the opportunity to do one!

Basically, fluro dives are night dives, using special lights and lenses to allow us to see fluorescent light emitted by certain organisms and creatures. It gives the underwater world a whole new dimension, one you have never experienced before!


That Scorpion fish that was always so well-camouflaged during a regular dive, is now glowing bright red, and those soft leather corals you usually swim by without even giving them a look, are now bright green! Suddenly there are spots of green and red glowing all over the reef!

What is usually a norm becomes the extravagant and if it doesn’t glow, it’s no longer special, regardless of how exotic it may be.

So, before you jump in, there are a couple of things that you need to consider…

1. Right equipment

First you need to make sure you have the right equipment. A light with a simple blue lens will not really give you the effect you’re looking for. Although there are different lights that can be used, we have found that the “black light” works best. You can check if it’s the correct light by shining it in a dark room: if you get the disco light effect (your teeth glow bright white or the white T-shirt you’re wearing looks like its plugged in), it’s NOT the correct one. A black light would make those things look dark blue or black. You will also need a yellow filter lens to block out the other light, enhancing the fluorescent light.

2. Dive planning
The second thing is dive planning. First, you should not do your first night dive as a fluro dive, the lights used are not nearly as bright and your vision is restricted making buoyancy and navigation a challenge. Also, you cannot be around other divers who are using normal lights as this will ruin the effect. The good thing is that you really don’t need to go deep or far to see all the crazy stuff. On Magic Island’s house reef at high tide you can be at 2m/7ft deep and just a stones throw away from the dive centre and see enough to keep you entertained for hours. Of course, all usual night dive planning should be considered.

If you have never done a fluro dive, you should definitely make one! In Magic Island Dive Resort in Moalboal, Cebu in the Philippines we offer this possibility. Our favourite way to make this dive: head out during sunset to see the famous Mandarinfish mating and when the sun has set we switch over to the fluro lights and lenses for the second show – a two for one deal!


Visit Magic Oceans Anda, Bohol and Magic Island Moalboal, Cebu… find out more at www.magicresorts.online.

Also on Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram!

Magic Resorts Philippines has two dive resorts: Magic Oceans Anda, Bohol and Magic Island Moalboal, Cebu. Have the Magic experience in two different locations. Rely on the same atmosphere, service and standards during every vacation! Blogs are supported by Marlon Managa, Dive Master and Marine Biologist at Magic Oceans.

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Scubaverse UWP Winners Gallery: Jan Leya

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Each month we give the winner of the Scubaverse Underwater Photography competition the opportunity to show off a little more of their work in a gallery. The July winner was Jan Leya.


What do you love about diving & underwater photography?

Anyone who has ever encountered a shark in the open sea can immediately see how
impressive, endangered and at the same time how beautiful our oceans are. Diving in the
sea or lake, in warm or cold waters, allows me to switch off and forget everyday life. My
camera allows me to capture these moments, archive them and show them to the world. To
show what beauty is so close to us and yet so invisible to almost everyone. Now, I use the
time outside of my workday to travel the world, photographing and showcasing its versatility
– especially under the surface. From small to large, I seek respectful, natural interaction with
our marine life to raise awareness of this fragile, acutely endangered ecosystem through my
images.

What equipment do you use?

What started with an inexpensive action camera solidified over the years to my current setup. Currently I use a SONY Alpha 6400 in a Fantasea body equipped with two INON Z-330
flashes and two Weefine Smart 3000 video lights. At the moment I prefer to use my SONY
90mm f/2.8 macro lens or the SIGMA 16mm f/1.4. I also have the SONY 30mm f/3.5 macro
lens, the SONY 10-18mm f/4 wide-angle lens and the SONY 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 at my
disposal

Where can our readers see more of your work?

www.instagram.com/blubber_jan


To enter the latest Scubaverse Underwater Photography competition, with a chance to win some great prizes as well as have your own gallery published, head over to the competition page and upload up to 3 images.

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Marine Life & Conservation Blogs

Dragons of the sea

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Guest Blog by Staci-lee Sherwood

The most fascinating and unique characteristic of the Syngnathidae family is how it’s the male that gives birth.  This fish family includes Seahorses,  Pipefish and Seadragon.  Having a head like a horse, Seahorses and Seadragons stand out as a fish species in the marine world.  They are true rock stars of the ocean and a favorite among photographers.  Their tiny size and elusiveness just add to their appeal.

Seadragons

Lesser known than their more famous cousins they are stars in their own right.  These tiny dragons of the sea are larger in size with more color and intriguing patterns.  Found only in southern Australian waters makes them rare.  There are three recognized species, the Weedy, Leafy and newly described Ruby seadragon.

Elusive species are more alluring to scientists because of the chance to be the first to discover something new.  Not much is known about their lives and researchers hope to shed light on these rainbow colored fish.  Their diet consists of tiny mysid shrimp and other zooplankton.  After mating the female deposits up to 300 eggs into the male’s brood patch who then fertilizes and carries them till birth.  Despite their being much larger than Seahorses, which range in size from 1 – 6 inches, they produce  about 1/3 of the eggs. Seadragons range in size from 13 – 18 inches

weedy seadragon: John Turnbull

In 2006 the IUCN listed them as Near Threatened on the Red List.  A lot has changed since then.  As the Seahorse population continues to decline China might look more toward the Seadragon to fill the void.

Seahorses

One fascinating fact about this family of fish they lack teeth or stomachs.  Instead they suck up food through their snout.  Lacking a stomach means food goes in and out rather quickly.  Seahorses will mate for life.  During the courtship dance they curl their tails and change color.  Following the mating ritual it’s the female that deposits up to 1,000 eggs in the male’s pouch.  A handy survival skill, like the chameleon, they can change color to blend into their surroundings.

Diminutive in size they capture the imagination of young and old alike but are in serious danger of going extinct.  Illegal harvesting by China for traditional medicine, used as decoration in key chains and pendants and polluted water have taken their toll.  Without global bans on their exploitation and fierce enforcement the world could lose these horse looking fish.  There are over 40 recognized species globally.

Florida

Many Floridians don’t know we have three species of seahorses, the Dwarf, Lined and Long Snouted.  These are all listed as either Vulnerable or Threatened in US waters.  One of the biggest threats in Florida is the heavily polluted water they live in.  Seahorses live in shallow tropical waters where their habitat is coral reefs, seagrass beds and mangroves.  Unfortunately in Florida the water quality is so poor most of the seagrass is dead while the bleaching of coral reefs has caused their decline.  A bleak future awaits this species.

Seahorses mating in the water column at Blue Heron Bridge in Florida, USA 2022

Globally all species are being pulled from the ocean so Florida populations are at risk of extinction.  A  favorite among divers, some local populations have fan clubs where divers will make special trips hoping to see them.

Australia

The White’s Seahorse, also known as the Sydney Seahorse, has a population decline over 90%.  In 2018 they became the second seahorse species in the world to be listed on the IUCN Red List Status as endangered.  Alarmed scientists took this opportunity to try to save them in a unique way.  Research showed this species uses artificial reefs if natural ones are absent.  David Harasti, Senior Research Scientist at Port Stephens Fisheries Institute, created the ‘Seahorse Hotels’ out of metal cages.  Once placed underwater they soon attract a variety of marine life like Coral and Sponges.  In a matter of weeks they’re covered and start attracting endangered Seahorses.

I spoke with Dr. Harasti about the use of these hotels for other species, especially those found in other parts of the world.  Regarding their use Harasti said the use of hotels may only be suitable for particular seahorse species. We know that they work really well for those species that like artificial habitats such as the White’s seahorse and Pot-belly seahorse in Australia and the Short-head seahorse found in Europe.”

Two tagged juvenile White’s Seahorses living in a hotel 4 months after deployment (Photo: D. Harasti)

Captive bred juvenile seahorses are released into hotels hoping they will breed and help recover their population.  Surveys show adult seahorses have also taken to them.  The project has only been around a few years so it’s too early to tell if the population will rebound.  Illegal harvesting worldwide must stop and laws must be enforced.  With such a steep decline of a species that gets little attention we need real conservation on a global scale now.  Click here to learn more about these hotels and watch some amazing videos https://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/species-protection/what-current/endangered-species2/whites-seahorse

South Africa

In 2017 a photograph taken off the eastern coast of South Africa in Sodwana Bay  by Savannah Nalu Olivier showed a new species barely the size of a fingernail.  After viewing the photograph, pygmy seahorse expert Richard Smith realized this was a new discovery.  This is the first pygmy seahorse discovered in the Indian Ocean.  Most pygmy seahorses survive by camouflage among vegetation so what an amazing find to see something so microscopic.  To read the 2020 study click here   https://zookeys.pensoft.net/article/50924/

Photo by Richard Smith, via University of Leeds

Global threats

According to Seahorse Trust the biggest threat to survival is the taking of an estimated 150,000,000 every year, mostly by China, to be used in their traditional medicine.  The use of Seahorses for asthma and impotence has no scientific basis and can be fixed with modern medicine.  Another 1,000,000 are caught for captivity in personal aquariums. There are no accurate numbers for how many end up used in trinkets but it’s estimated 1,000,000 are lost.  At this rate we will push this species toward extinction.

In the past twenty years there has been a global increase in the capture and selling for use in about 80 countries.  Varying degrees of threats exist for different species and different regions.  Somewhere between 50 -97% decline in their population makes for an urgent call to end their use whether for personal and medical reasons.  The world must agree to a ban with enforcement or lose one of its most amazing creatures .

Help save our Seahorses and Seadragons with these do’s and don’ts:

  • Don’t buy dried Seahorses, or trinkets that use them
  • Don’t buy live Seahorses for aquariums
  • Do use modern medicine which is effective and safe instead of Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Never pollute the water
  • Support conservation efforts
  • Spread the message

To learn how to help Seahorses  https://www.theseahorsetrust.org/

To help conservation in Australia https://www.visitsealife.com/sydney/conservation/


Header Image: Tony Brown

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