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TUSA Launches the SAV-7 EVO2 DPV

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I first came across TUSA scooters being dived ‘in anger’ (aka used for real) during Divetech’s annual Inner Space rebreather event held in Grand Cayman.

Inner Space 2012, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Divetech, scuba diving in Grand Cayman, scooter sign, Nancy Easterbrook, The Underwater Marketing CompanyI was happily bimbling along the wreck of the USS Kittiwake when a rebreather diver whizzed past me. For a brief moment I couldn’t work out how he was moving so fast. His hands were full of a quite large camera system and he wasn’t appearing to fin at all. And then I spotted that his legs were almost akimbo. He was sitting on a bright yellow TUSA SAV-7 EVO scooter – rather like someone would straddle a horse – and this was efficiently driving him through the water.

TUSA has just launched the the latest iteration of their diver propulsion vehicle – the TUSA SAV-7 EVO2 DPV.

This scooter has a useful depth rating of 70 metres / 230 feet and features the patented ‘Hands-Free Riding Saddle’. If you are not familiar with this DPV, this is a ‘hands free’ scooter. You navigate it by twisting and arching your body accordingly, leaving your hands free to take photographs or check your gauges and computer, hence the seat on both the EVO and EVO2 is quite important. Very loosely it could be compared to a Western saddle. A flange or flat raised pommel (incorporating a lifting handle) is located to the front and the rear of the saddle. Attached to the front plate of the saddle, below the flange, are two wing arms. One on each side of the plate. These are secured in place by a ‘super knob’, basically a large nut. To use the relevant wing, you unscrew the knob and swing the relevant arm out 90 degrees, before screwing home the knob again.

Inner Space 2012, TUSA SAV-7 EVO scooter, Jay Easterbrook, SAV-7 EVO2 DPV, Diver Propulsion Vehicle, diving scooter, scuba diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing CompanyHow does this work underwater? Just imagine the diver is lying horizontally face down with the DPV secured between their legs, as if they were sitting astride a bar stool. The wings are reminiscent of pillion foot pegs on a motorbike. However they are longer and there is no physical contact by the diver piloting the DPV, ie they are not lying on them. The wing is a handle for an additional diver to hold onto for towing purposes, or they are a means of attaching equipment to the DPV. Two holes have been cut into each wing, allowing you to clip or karabina off kit to the wing. When not in use, the wing(s) can be retracted and secured in place to provide better steamlining, as they lie on the front of the saddle plate. TUSA state that this DPV is capable of comfortably towing two divers, hence the two wings.

I can see this scooter being quite popular in resorts like the Maldives where the currents are famous (or infamous?) for their strength. Whilst it is possible to mitigate for hard currents by diving at specific tide times, using reef hooks and diving with the current, there are times where you just want to go and look at a particular coral head, or fully explore a wreck, and you cannot get there because you are unable to swim against the hard current, or you do not have the time or gas to do it. TUSA state that by using a DPV you can travel 3 / 4 faster than finning normally. Plus using a diver propulsion vehicle can decrease fatigue and reduce gas consumption therefore allowing the diver to go further and faster in a variety of conditions, extending their time in underwater.

So what has TUSA changed on this model? Three things: speed, range and runtime.

The design of the rotational speed adjustment function has been reviewed to make it quicker and more responsive, and the DPV is now capable of 4.5km / 2.8 mph compared to 4.2km / 2.6mp on the previous model.

TUSA has also substantially increased the range, torque and burn time by exchanging the Lead-acid battery for a high performing, long-lasting Lithium-Ion Battery (complete with an L.E.D Battery Life Indicator). The SAV-7Evo had a range of 4,200 metres / 2.6 miles with a burn time of 80 minutes. The Evo2’s figures are quite impressive. A range of 7,200 metres / 4.5 miles with a burn time of 120 minutes. Available in black.

Here are the specifications:

Speed: 4.5 km / 2.8 mph
Depth Rating: 70 metres / 230 feet
Dimensions: Length 720mm x Width / Length 28.5″ x Width 13.5″
Surface Weight with Battery: 20.5kg / 45 lbs
Submerged Weight with Battery: 0.3kg / 0.5 lbs
Range in Open Water: 7,200 metres / 4.5miles
Run Time in Open Water: 120 minutes
Battery Type: Lithium-Ion
Speed Adjuster: Rotational Speed Control with Variable Pitch-Type Propeller (3-Step: slow, standard and fast)
Safety Device: Sensation Current Shut-Down Device, Water Leakage Sensor, and Water-Cooling Motor Deployment

For more information about Tusa products, visit www.tusa.com.

Roz is the Founder of The Underwater Marketing Company, Co-founder of EUROTEK, and established TEKDiveUSA. She is a PADI IDC Staff Instructor, a BSAC Advanced Instructor, and a rebreather and Trimix diver. Before moving into the PR field she worked as a full time recreational instructor in the UK and abroad, on History Channel and National Geographic documentaries, as a safety diver, and modelled underwater.

Gear News

Northern Diver’s Storm Semi-Dry Wetsuit gets an updated look

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The Storm Semi-Dry Wetsuit from Northern Diver has been around for decades and is the perfect choice for new or expert divers, casual or professional divers, first-time wetsuit buyers as well as seasoned, experienced watersports enthusiasts.

Suitable for use in cool waters, the Storm’s anatomical pattern is crafted for optimum comfort, and the seals at the wrists and ankles feature Northern Diver’s widely acclaimed smooth skin, which has a great feel and helps stop water flush.

Developed over time to be constructed from a softer and more flexible neoprene which makes it easy to put on and take off, the water suit maximizes the range of motion and improves overall comfort. The front entry vertical-cut YKK plastic zip increases long-term durability and ease of use.

Abrasion-resistant subtle overprinting on shoulders protects against shifting gear such as BCDs from slipping off the shoulder, printed protection on the cuffs helps with grip to keep any dive wrist gauges and computers in place. Strong pad elbow, knee and seat areas are built into the pattern of the wetsuit giving even more abrasion resistance in the highest wear areas.

The Storm steamer wetsuit is predominantly 6mm thick in the vital areas of the body, with a 4mm thickness in areas requiring extra flexibility and movement. Ribbed neoprene features at the back of the elbows and knees for further comfort and flexibility when in action.

Constructed from high quality superstretch neoprene with reinforced blind stitching in critical stress points, these wetsuits are designed for durability and flexibility whether you’re on or in the water. The perfect balance between function and aesthetic appeal, this steamer wetsuit has long arms and long legs making it most effective at maintaining warmth.

For more information about Northern Diver products visit their website by clicking here.

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Gear News

Grown, Not Made: Introducing the fourth element Surface Suit

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A great wetsuit that keeps you warm can make or break your time in the water and neoprene has long been the material of choice for thermal protection. However, Petroleum-based wetsuits rely on oil exploration and drilling, neither of which are good for our planet. The high levels of energy required to produce petroleum neoprene contribute towards climate change, releasing toxic gasses emitted in the chemical processing plants.

Surface, made using Yulex Pure™, offers a unique solution. Without compromising on strength and performance, it uses completely natural rubber that comes from a sustainable source using earth-gentle processes.

Yulex Pure™ is FSC® Certified, ultra-pure natural rubber grown in the USA. The plants are grown without artificial irrigation systems and the materials are processed with recycled water. Even the waste plant material after the rubber extraction process is used as biomass fuel for electricity generation. The lining fabrics are created from ocean-bound plastic bottles, recycled and spun into polyester yarn. Water-based glues are used to bond the foam to the fabrics and the prints are water-based or embossed; every care has been taken to minimise the environmental impact of this product.


The Surface is designed for life in the water from diving, freediving and snorkelling to surface watersports such as stand up paddleboarding, surfing and open water swimming. The minimal design features a mini chest zipper, eliminating the need for a back zip, radically improving mobility and minimizing the opportunity for water to enter the suit though the teeth of the zip. The flexible rubber of the suit provides freedom of movement and the inner ankle and wrist seals ensure that suit flush is minimized.

Do you want a more sustainable wetsuit that will enable future generations to keep enjoying our underwater world?

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