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New Underwater Museum on The Great Barrier Reef

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Jason deCaires Taylor is drawing closer to the installation of his latest and most ambitious underwater art project to date: MOUA, the Museum Of Underwater Art within the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

Undoubtedly one of Jason’s most challenging projects the new museum will feature a series of galleries located throughout Townsville, Magnetic Island, Palm Island and the Great Barrier Reef region. The first galleries are due to open to the public in December 2019.

For the first time Jason will be combining a range of inter-tidal and fully submerged artworks including pioneering large scale architectural installations and sculptural works that change in response to the environmental conditions.

MOUA is also the first major project for Jason in the Southern Hemisphere and the installation will include the first ever sculptures to be placed within the world famous Great Barrier Reef. Already more than two years in the planning, MOUA is a not for profit collaborative project funded by the Australian and Queensland Governments with Australian corporate partners. The project brings together reef, tourism and science partners including the James Cook University and the Australian Institute of Marine Science and seeks approvals through the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority.

The museum aims to encourage environmental awareness, increase knowledge of marine ecosystems and help instigate social change whilst leading visitors to appreciate the breathtaking natural beauty of the Great Barrier Reef. Through interpretation centres, trained guides and thoughtful designs of both the artworks and the experience, the sculptures will convey vital messages about the threats to oceanic marine systems and our deep-rooted dependency on the sea.

The first installation, due to be unveiled in December 2019, will be a coastal based, solar powered sculpture of a young indigenous girl issuing a warning  about rising sea temperatures. Using live temperature data from active sites on the Great Barrier Reef, the outer layer of the sculpture will change colour in response to changes in water temperature creating a visual representation of live conditions underwater. By using data supplied by AIMS atmospheric weather stations the work aims to connect the general public directly to marine issues as they occur in real-time. Conveying statistical scientific data in a raw, visceral and emotive way.

The second phase of the museum will feature a Coral Greenhouse situated in the heart of the Great Barrier Reef at John Brewer Reef. The large scale 12m high underwater botanical structure is designed as an art space, underwater educational centre, science laboratory and a secure space for marine life, a symbol of underwater stewardship which connects to the local community and wealth of marine science institutions in the local region.

The unique skeletal design has been engineered to dissipate ocean currents whilst providing an intricate habitat for marine life. The contemporary Greenhouse will be surrounded by sea-scaping; a series of coral nurseries, organic stems and underwater trees all designed in a way to facilitate coral rehabilitation activities.

For more information please visit the website by clicking here or follow Jason on Instagram.

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Join DEMA for “Decoding Congress: How Politics Shape the Dive Industry”

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Join DEMA’s President & CEO, Tom Ingram, for an engaging discussion with Emily Coyle, a seasoned Washington lobbyist with over 25 years of experience in federal policymaking.

Learn how Congress does (and doesn’t) work, how politics influence policy outcomes, and their direct impact on the dive industry. Emily and Tom will also provide an update on the DIVE BOAT Act’s progress and answer attendee questions.

Don’t miss “Decoding Congress: How Politics Shape the Dive Industry” on June 25th at 12:00 PM PDT / 3:00 PM EDT.

Register in advance here and submit your questions for Emily.

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The Ocean Cleanup & Coldplay announce limited edition LP made using river plastic

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  • Limited ‘Notebook Edition’ LP release of new Coldplay album ‘Moon Music’ made using river plastic removed from the Rio Las Vacas, Guatemala by The Ocean Cleanup

  • First collaborative product the latest step in Coldplay’s support for global non-profit

  • Innovative product partnerships essential for long-term success of The Ocean Cleanup’s mission to rid the oceans of plastic

The Ocean Cleanup and Coldplay have confirmed that a limited ‘Notebook Edition’ LP release of the band’s album ‘Moon Music’ will be manufactured using plastic intercepted by The Ocean Cleanup from the Rio Las Vacas, Guatemala.

The mission of The Ocean Cleanup is to rid the oceans of plastic. To achieve this, the non-profit operates a dual strategy: cleaning up legacy plastic in the oceans and deploying Interceptors to capture trash in rivers and stop it entering the oceans.

Today’s announcement with Coldplay of this Notebook Edition LP is an example of the innovative product partnerships The Ocean Cleanup creates to give this plastic a new life in sustainable and durable products, ensuring the plastic never re-enters the marine environment.

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The Ocean Cleanup project deployed Interceptor 006 in the Rio Las Vacas in 2023 to prevent plastic emissions into the Gulf of Honduras. Interceptor 006 made significant impact and captured large quantities of plastic – which has now been sorted, blended, tested and used to manufacture Coldplay’s limited edition physical release. The final product consists of 70% river plastic intercepted by The Ocean Cleanup and 30% recycled waste plastic bottles from other sources.The successful production of the Notebook Edition LP using intercepted river plastic marks an exciting new phase in Coldplay’s broad and long-standing support for The Ocean Cleanup. Coldplay provide financial support for the non-profit’s cleaning operations, sponsor Interceptor 005 in the Klang River, Malaysia (which the band named ‘Neon Moon I’) and share The Ocean Cleanup’s mission with millions of their fans during their record-breaking Music of the Spheres tour.Coldplay and The Ocean Cleanup collaborated closely during the intensive testing and quality control process, alongside processing and manufacturing partners Biosfera GT, Compuestos y Derivados S.A., Morssinkhof and Sonopress.Having proven the potential of their partnership, The Ocean Cleanup and Coldplay will continue to explore new and innovative ways to combine their impact and accelerate progress in the largest cleanup in history.

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“Coldplay is an incredible partner for us and I’m thrilled that our plastic catch has helped bring Moon Music to life.” said Boyan Slat, Founder and CEO of The Ocean Cleanup. “Ensuring the plastic we catch never re-enters the marine environment is essential to our mission, and I’m excited to see how we’ll continue innovating with Coldplay and our other partners to rid the oceans of plastic – together.”

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About the Ocean Cleanup

The Ocean Cleanup is an international non-profit that develops and scales technologies to rid the world’s oceans of plastic. They aim to achieve this goal through a dual strategy: intercepting in rivers to stop the flow and cleaning up what has already accumulated in the ocean. For the latter, The Ocean Cleanup develops and deploys large-scale systems to efficiently concentrate the plastic for periodic removal. This plastic is tracked and traced to certify claims of origin when recycling it into new products. To curb the tide via rivers, The Ocean Cleanup has developed Interceptor™ Solutions to halt and extract riverine plastic before it reaches the ocean. As of June 2024, the non-profit has collected over 12 million kilograms (26.4 million pounds) of plastic from aquatic ecosystems around the world. Founded in 2013 by Boyan Slat, The Ocean Cleanup now employs a broadly multi-disciplined team of approximately 140. 

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