O’Three Ambassador Blog: Road Trip to Croatia

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O’Three ambassador Rick Ayrton and friends drive to Croatia for some diving

Off on a road trip to Croatia for some deeper warm water diving. Owing to travel difficulty with baggage allowances a group of us decided to drive this year. Seemed like a good idea at the time!

We have 1200+ miles ahead of us; 19hrs of driving if non stop. We are all insured to drive so hopefully will make steady progress – and hopefully we all remain mates!

Loaded onto the Channel Tunnel Train

Loaded onto the Channel Tunnel Train

I will post on my return about the trip. Thanks to O’Three, I am able to take (as well as my drysuit) a 6×5 semi dry and a Deepskin tech vest for added insulation.

I have issues getting into a drysuit when the air temperature is over 30°C and the surface water temperature is over 25°C. The trouble with the Croatian Adriatic is that when you are on a wreck at 50m+ it is a predictable 13 – 15°C… certainly cold enough for a dry suit.

Autobahn!

Autobahn!

From past experience, the cold at the deepest part of the dive is bearable since you are active and moving around. As you ascend, the water warms and all is fine. In the past when I have tried a semi dry in the Med (for long deep dives) it wasn’t the dive phase that was the problem but the early deep stops where it remains cold and all you can do is wait for time to pass.

Modern decompression theory has cast doubt on the wisdom of deep stops so as divers  we tend to ascend rather more quickly in the first stages of our decompression – getting to water with a temperature that an O’Three 6×5 semi-dry can handle with ease!

Got there!

Got there!

Part 2 of this report will hopefully give some answers!

othree-2015-logo-400pngRick is an ambassador for UK-based drysuit manufacturer O’Three. To find out more about O’Three, visit www.othree.co.uk.

Rick Ayrton

Rick Ayrton

Rick enjoys both close-up & wide angle underwater photography, but particularly enjoys the challenge of taking images of wrecks and happily admitting that getting good images of deep UK wrecks is a fickle process with many variables that he is still trying to master.

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