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PRODUCT RECALL: Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitter and Suunto Tank POD

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Suunto announces a recall of all Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitters and Suunto Tank PODs

Suunto has identified a potential safety risk affecting all Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitters  and Suunto Tank PODs which wirelessly transmit tank air pressure to compatible Suunto dive computers. In two reported incidents, the exterior case of a Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitter has failed during regular dry land pressure testing. Although extremely rare, this represents a potential risk of injury due to the risk of bursting.

Diver safety is of highest importance to Suunto. That is why Suunto has decided to initiate a recall of all Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitters and Suunto Tank PODs.

All consumers who have a Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitter or Tank POD are instructed to bring their products to an authorized Suunto dive dealer or a Suunto Authorized Service Center for inspection and upgrade. The process is free of charge for the consumers. All Transmitters and Tank PODs must not be used before the upgrade has been made.

Suunto sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused by this. As a complementary service, Suunto will provide a battery replacement free of charge and a one-year warranty from the date of inspection for all upgraded products.

Identification of affected products:

Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitter

  • SS019098000 and SS005397000 SUUNTO WIRELESS TANK PRESSURE TRANSMITTER
  • Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitter has a black cone-shaped plastic case – with SUUNTO, FINLAND printed on top of the case.
  • The old model a black plastic base. The new model has a transparent plastic based with an LED light.
  • Size: diameter approximately 4 cm, length approximately 8 cm
  • Compatible Products: Suunto D4i, D4i Novo, D6i, D6i Novo, D9, D9tx, DX, Vytec, Vytec DS, Vyper Novo, HelO2, Vyper Air.

Suunto Tank POD

  • SS020306000 SUUNTO TANK POD
  • Suunto Tank POD has black cone-shaped plastic case with SUUNTO TANK POD, MADE IN FINLAND printed in gray color on the case and a transparent plastic base.
  • Size: diameter approximately 4 cm, length appoximately 8 cm
  • Compatible products: Suunto EON Steel dive computer.

What to do if you own a Suunto Wireless Tank Pressure Transmitter or a Suunto Tank POD

  1. Do not use the affected product(s) before it has been upgraded.
  2. Bring the product(s) to your nearest authorized Suunto dive dealer or a Suunto Authorized Service Center for inspection and upgrade. A list of dealers and authorized service centers can be found at suunto.com/dealer-locator. You can also use the free Suunto Online Service Request, www.suunto.com/servicerequest (only available for certain countries) to get your product(s) picked up from your home/office.
  3. When you receive your upgraded product(s), please register the product(s) at MySuunto to ensure you receive a full one-year warranty extension from the date of inspection.

More information on the recall can be found at www.suunto.com/recall.

Suunto Consumer Support  (available 24/ in English):

Australia +61 1800 240 498 (toll free)

New Zealand +64 988 75 223

United Kingdom +44 20 360 805 34

USA +1 855 258 0900 (toll free)

Canada +1 855 624 9080 (toll free)

China – Hong Kong +852 58060687

Support available from 9 am to 5 pm local time on business days:

Austria +43 72 088 3104

Canada +1 855 624 9084 (toll free) support available in French from 6 AM to 11 AM EDT

China – Mainland +86 400 661 1646 (in Mandarin)

China – Hong Kong +852 58060687 (in Mandarin)

Finland +358 94 245 0127

France +33 48 168 0926

Germany +49 893 803 8778

Italy +39 029 475 1965

Japan +81 34 520 9417 from 10 am to 6 pm

Netherlands +31 10 713 7269 (in English)

Russia +7 499 918 7148

Spain +34 911 143 175

Sweden +46 85 250 0730

Switzerland +41 44 580 9988

News

Introducing the Cinebags Dome Port Case CB74

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The CB74 Port Case is a heavy duty case to protect and carry your compact sized dome port. Designed to protect and transport 6″-8″ ports from Nauticam, Zen, Sea&Sea and similar sized ports.

The CB74 is made of a heavy duty tarpaulin fabric with padded sidewalls to protect your dome port in your dive luggage. The oversized zippers allow for quick easy access to the port pouch.

A mesh pouch is attached to flap can be used to store your spare port cover.


A small velcro pouch is located in the back compartment of the CB74 for small parts like spare o-rings, or o-ring grease.


The front of the CB74 has a neoprene carry handle to make transporting the port case a breeze. The opposite side has an area you can write your name and also label the pouch so it can be easily identified.

Features:

  • heavy duty tarpaulin fabric
  • padded sidewalls
  • oversized zippers
  • mesh pouch for accessories
  • mesh pouch to store port cover
  • neoperene carry handle

The CB74 Dome Port and other CineBags Underwater Products are available through the dedicated underwater dealer network. 

For more information visit the Cinebags website by clicking here.

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Dive Training Blogs

When is it a good day to dive?

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By Rick Peck

The standard answer is “It’s always a good day to dive.” The real question is: When is it a day we should not dive?

There are several factors that go into a decision for a dive day.

  • Weather
  • Waves
  • Tides (if applicable)
  • Physical condition
  • Mental condition
  • Water visibility

Weather

We would all like to dive in bright sunny conditions. Unfortunately, that doesn’t always happen. It is always a good idea to check the forecast before a dive day. The weather directly before a dive might be bright and sunny, but in some areas, thunderstorms roll in quickly. While it may be an interesting experience to see a lightning storm underwater with the strobe effect, we do have to come up sometime. A 30+ pound lightning rod strapped to your back makes for a very dangerous exit.

Wind is also a concern. Storms that roll in quickly can bring gust fronts that make for dangerous conditions. It could be flat and calm when you enter, and you may ascend after the dive into 5-6 foot chop with a dangerous exit onto the boat. Having a boat drop on your head or getting tangled in the ladder is not fun.

Waves and Tides

Shore diving in a coastal area makes waves a concern. Waves are generated by wind speed, duration and fetch. If there is a storm offshore you could be seeing big waves with very little wind in your area. Linked to the wave action is the tide. At some sites, waves tend to fizzle out at extreme high tide, making for easier entry and exits.

Tides can also affect your dive in an inlet. There is a popular dive site in my area that normally dives from a half-hour before high tide to a half-hour after high tide because of the current generated by the tidal change. The tidal currents can become so strong that an average diver can’t overcome them. The question is: does the tide change match the time you have available to dive? Your local dive shop should have recommendations on where and when is the best time to shore dive. As we learned in our Open Water class, local knowledge is the best.

Physical Condition

Are you healthy enough to dive? Do you have the physical conditioning to safely do the dive you are planning? Pushing your physical limits directly after a cold or allergy attack could lead to an ear injury or worse. If you have been sick, maybe you don’t have the energy reserves to rescue yourself or a buddy if required. The typical “Oh, I’ll be alright” could put not only you but your dive buddy at risk as well. Don’t let your ego write checks that your body can’t fulfill.

Mental Condition

You could compare diving to driving a car. We have all heard of distracted driving. If you are mentally upset or dealing with a great deal of stress, it might be prudent to evaluate whether it’s a good day to dive. Frustration and an urgency to get into the water to “relax” could mean you are skipping items on your buddy checks and self-checks. Unless you have the mental discipline to set these worries aside, it is probably better to dive another day.

Water Visibility

While there is a segment of the diving population that likes to “Muck Dive,” in general we prefer to see what is around us. One type of diving where visibility is important is drift diving. It is a two-fold problem, if you stay shallow enough to avoid obstructions, you can’t see anything. If you go deep enough to see the bottom, depending on the speed of the current, there is a possibility of being driven into a coral head or some other obstruction that you don’t see approaching. It is also much easier to become separated from your buddy. Remember to discuss and set a lost buddy protocol before the dive.

Summary

While it seems like all the stars and moon must align in order to safely dive, it’s really simple. Check the weather, check the tides (If applicable), do a self-assessment, and don’t be reluctant to cancel a dive if the conditions warrant it when you arrive at the dive site. A little planning and forethought will lead to a safe enjoyable dive. Always remember to dive within the limits of your training, conditioning, and skill set.


To find out more about International Training, visit www.tdisdi.com.

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Explore the amazing triangle of Red Sea Reefs - The Brothers, Daedalus and Elphinstone on board the brand new liveaboard Big Blue.  With an option to add on a week at Roots Red Sea before or after. 

Strong currents and deep blue water are the catalysts that bring the pelagic species flocking to these reefs. The reefs themselves provide exquisite homes for a multitude of marine life.  The wafting soft corals are adorned with thousands of colourful fish. The gorgonian fans and hard corals provide magnificent back drops, all being patrolled by the reef’s predatory species.

£1475 per person based on double occupancy.  Soft all inclusive board basis, buffet meals with snacks, tea and coffee always available.  Add a week on at Roots Red Sea Resort before or after the liveaboard for just £725pp.  Flights and transfers are included.  See our brochure linked above for the full itinerary.

This trip will be hosted by The Scuba Place.  Come Dive with Us!

Call 020 3515 9955 or email john@thescubaplace.co.uk

www.thescubaplace.co.uk

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