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Jack Ingle Announces Technical Diving Malta Wreck Expedition For 2017

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technical diving

Jack Ingle

After excellent expeditions in 2016, technical diving pro Jack Ingle is planning more trips in 2017. First up – some technical wreck diving in Malta.

The diving is stunning in Malta with excellent visibility and fabulous wrecks. The dives are all around the 40 to 70 metre range with some excellent WW1 and WW2 wrecks. The expedition will cost £690 per diver, which includes 5 days boat diving, self catering accommodation (high quality apartments), group vehicle hire, transfers to and from airport and dive sites, air and hire of twinsets (or Rebreather cylinders). There will also be a deco station with support Diver and back up gas on the line.

Nitrox, Helium and stage Deco cylinders are available but not included in the overall price.

Flights are available to Malta at around £180. Flight details and how to book them will be sent to you later once your place has been confirmed.

The actual dives planned will be arranged around the group of divers and will be dependent on their wishes, qualifications and experience. You can discuss this with Jack Ingle directly. All divers must be a minimum of Dive Leader, Dive master or equivalent. Some of the sites available are listed below, but there are many more.

technical diving

HMS Southwold, Bow section. (Photo by Cathy De Lara)

Le Polynesienne

This wreck was a French liner. Length 156 metres powered by a steam engine from 12 coal boilers giving her a cruising speed of 17 knots. She was hit by a torpedo from a German U boat in 1918 and lays in 60 metres of water. This is a stunning wreck and one you will want to visit more than once.

HMS Stubborn

This is a British Submarine P238 (S class), built in 1942 and is 66 metres long. She is sitting in 56 metres of water at a 10 degree list. Her armaments were 7 torpedo tubes, a 3 inch gun on the fore deck and one 20mm machine gun behind the conning tower. She carried a crew of 44 men and was scuttled at the end of the war.

HMS Southwold

This is a Hunt Class Destroyer and is 86 metres in length. The Southwold was escorting other vessels when she struck a mine (1942). She was taken in tow to Malta but sank before making the safe haven. She sits in 70 metres on her starboard side. She has two sections and needs more than one dive to visit both Bow and Stern.

Schnell Boat

German MTB boat, intact wreck, WW2, torpedoes still in tubes, great dive, 70 metres.

Other sites

This area is littered with many wrecks, mainly from the WW2 era. Some of these include Hellespont, HMS St Angelo, Imperial Eagle, HM Drifter Eddy, Um El Faroud, and many more.

technical diving

HMS Southwold, Bow section. (Photo by Barry Smith)

The expedition takes place in May 2017.

  • Week 1: 30th April to 6th May 2017
  • Week 2: 6th to 12th May 2017
  • Week 3: 12th to 18th May 2017

A deposit of £300 is required to secure a place with the balance due 8 weeks prior to the expedition.

For more information email Jack Ingle at Jack@jackingle.co.uk or call him on 0208 650 6089 or on 07759 404891.

To find out more about Jack and the courses he offers, visit www.jackingle.co.uk.

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Announcing the Winners of Scubaverse’s June 2022 Underwater Photo & Video Contests

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Another bumper month packed with amazing images and videos from around the world! It has certainly been another great month for entries in both contests – your underwater photos and videos are just getting better and better! Thanks to all who entered.

To find out who the winner of Scubaverse.com’s June 2022 Underwater Photo Contest is, click here.

To find out who the winner of Scubaverse.com’s June 2022 Underwater Video Contest is, click here.

If you’re not a winner this month, then please do try again. July’s photo and video contests are now open.

To enter Scubaverse.com’s July 2022 Underwater Photo Contest, click here.

To enter Scubaverse.com’s July 2022 Underwater Video Contest, click here.

Good luck!!!

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Dive Training Blogs

Tips for… Navigation

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Not the most fun of topics we guess, but pretty important for any diver! Now we are sure that there are some of you out there that steer away from the navigation side and are quite happy to follow along at the back. But if you are one of those divers and the reason is because you think that it is ridiculously hard.. we want to give you a few basic tips to help you!

Now using a compass may look scary but actually there is not much to it. First rule to remember… North is North under the water as well as on land… it doesn’t change! So, with that in mind we can use that pretty easily under the water to at least give us a point of reference whilst we are diving, even if you are not leading it. Knowing the direction that you are going and how deep you are is a good reference and will help you to become more confident. Get into the habit of taking a ‘bearing’ – fancy word for direction – on the surface before going under and check the bearing as you are diving.

Knowing which way is left and right – well, when going right, the numbers increase, and when going left, the numbers decrease… easy! Starting off with turning left and right 90 degrees will start to get you into the habit of making turns. Try not to use complicated numbers when you first start off, nobody likes maths at the best of times, let alone trying to add 273 to 32 under the water! Keep it basic.

Last but not least, navigating is not all about using a compass. If you are not a fan of it and want to keep your dives simple, there is nothing wrong with natural navigation. There are some amazing sites around our coastline that are perfect for this – harbour walls, piers, open sea coves, all allow the point of reference to be followed on one side of your body on the way out and the opposite on the way back. You can also check that you are going the right way on your return as the depth will start to decrease. This is a great way to start building your confidence with navigating if you are new to it, and what is even better, lots of marine life love to congress around these rocky areas!

Other aspects to consider to throw into your natural navigation bag are picking some land marks during your dives. If there is something notable that doesn’t move (fish are not highly recommended!) take a note of this and use it as a reference and pick another. On the return journey, you can use these ‘markers’ to find your way back to the starting point. A nice and simple way to find where you are going.

So, give it a go in a nice shallow bay area and see how you get on… practice makes perfect!


Find out more at www.duttonsdivers.com

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A luxurious dive resort in the heart of Lembeh Strait. Enjoy refined services while exploring the rich waters of Indonesia.

The resort is nestled around an ocean front deck and swimming-pool (with pool-bar) which is the perfect place to enjoy a sundowner cocktail at the end of a busy day of critter-diving.

All accommodation is full board and includes three sumptuous meals a day. Breakfast and lunch are buffet meals and in the evening dining is a la carte.

Book and stay before the end of June and benefit from no single supplements in all room types!

Booking deadline: Subject to availability – book and stay before end of June 2022

Call Diverse Travel on 01473 852002 or email info@diversetravel.co.uk.

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