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HMCS Annapolis finally down and open for divers

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Annapolis

CANADA – Seven years since its original purchase, the HMCS Annapolis was finally sunk off the coast of Gambier Island in Halkett Bay Provincial Marine Park last Saturday (4th April).

More than two hundred spectators showed up in charter boats and personal crafts to watch the sinking firsthand, while hundreds more from all around the world tuned in online to witness the sinking.

“I feel like I’ve got 3,000 tonnes of weight off my shoulders,” said Howard Robins, president of the Artificial Reef Society of BC (ARSBC).

“It’s down, it’s over. The project is finished. It’s been delivered to the province and we’re very pleased. It’s a successful project — number eight — and now she’s going to be our living laboratory of study and research.”

The ARSBC has been working to sink the Annapolis in Halkett Bay since its purchase back in 2008. A drop in the value of recycled metal, changes to federal government regulations and environmental concerns over the toxicity of the paint on the Annapolis have all stymied the project along the way.

But the ship is finally at the bottom of the ocean, and according to Robins, the sinking went perfectly.

“It flooded from the bottom up, as we intended,” Robins said. “As that water kept moving upward, spreading out throughout the ship, she went down in a very even and stately manner and landed squarely on her keel. She’s completely upright underwater right now at the prescribed depth.”

Charges were placed inside the hull of the vessel, six on each side of the ship in various locations. Once detonated, water to fill the ship very quickly.

The sunken Annapolis will be used for a few different purposes. Primarily, it will serve as an artificial reef for marine life to make a home in. This marine life will be studied periodically by the ARSBC and documented on a website that is currently in development.

“This ship will provide dark recessed areas and act as a pinnacle, with cave-like settings suitable for rockfish species, notably yellow-eye, tiger and quillback,” Jeff Marliave, vice president of Marine Sciences at the Vancouver Aquarium, said in a press release.

As of Monday, Robins reported that a few of the more curious fish in the area are already beginning to check it out. Over the coming weeks and months, they will start to see more crustaceans and plant life making the Annapolis their home, he added.

Due to its close proximity to Vancouver, the Annapolis can also be used for search and rescue and small submersible training.

It is also expected to be a good tourism draw for recreational divers. This is the eighth ship sunk by the ARSBC, and many of the people who turned out Saturday to watch the sinking were divers excited for another wreck to explore.

Once the Annapolis had sunk, professional divers went down to check that everything had gone according to plan.

“They’re very satisfied that the ship is in great condition,” Robins said. “So at this point, we have declared the wreck open for recreational diving.”

 

Source: www.coastreporter.net

Marine Life & Conservation

Get ready for a year of incredible underwater encounters in 2021

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Giants from the world of underwater photography have joined forces with Bite-Back Shark & Marine Conservation to create a unique and stunning 2021 calendar to raise funds for its campaigns to make Britain’s retailers shark free.

The line-up of award-winning contributors includes Alex Mustard, Amanda Cotton, Christian Vizl, David Doubilet, Doug Perrine, Ellen Cuylaerts, George Probst, Greg Lecouer, Jason Isley, Laura Storm, Shawn Heinrichs and Tanya Houppermans.

Each photographer has handpicked and donated a breathtaking image along with commentary that features month-by-month in the top class publication.

Campaign director at Bite-Back, Graham Buckingham, said: “This edition is packed with spectacular images to celebrate the marine environment in all its glory. Significantly every purchase of this calendar will directly fund our campaigns to end the trade and consumption of shark products in the UK.”

Alone, Bite-Back has made significant progress in limiting the sale of shark fin soup, shark meat and items containing shark, such as supplements, nationwide.

Graham added: “For the equivalent of £1 a month, we hope scuba divers and ocean lovers will enjoy admiring this rare and magnificent collection of images all year long.  And, of course, it makes a fabulous Christmas present too.”

The high quality A4 calendar is printed on recycled paper using vegetable-based inks by a climate neutral printer. It can be purchased at www.bite-back.com/shop for £12 (including free UK delivery) and shipped worldwide. Don’t miss out!

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Marine Life & Conservation

BLUE EARTH – Future Frogmen Podcast Series – Deep-Sea Stories From a Shadow Diver: a conversation with Richie Kohler

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A series of conservation educational podcasts from Future Frogmen, introduced by Jeff Goodman.


Deep Sea Stories From a Shadow Diver: a conversation with Richie Kohler. 

This episode of the Blue Earth Podcast is a conversation with Richie Kohler. He’s an explorer, technical wreck diver, shipwreck historian, filmmaker, and author.

Richie was featured in Robert Kurson’s incredible book “Shadow Divers ”. It’s a thrilling true story about Richie and John Chatterton’s quest to identify the wreck of an unknown WWII German U-boat (submarine), 65 miles off the coast of New Jersey. They dedicated six years of their lives attempting to identify the wreck.

Richie has travelled the world and explored many deep wrecks, including the Andrea Doria, Titanic, and Britannic. He’s the author of “Mystery of The Last Olympian” about the Britannic.


Richard E Hyman Bio

Richard is the Chairman and President of Future Frogmen.

Born from mentoring and love of the ocean, Richard is developing an impactful non-profit organization. His memoir, FROGMEN, details expeditions aboard Jacques-Yves Cousteau’s famed ship Calypso.

Future Frogmen, Inc. is a nonprofit organization and public charity that works to improve ocean health by deepening the connection between people and nature. They foster ocean ambassadors and future leaders to protect the ocean by accomplishing five objectives.


You can find more episodes and information at www.futurefrogmen.org and on most social platforms @futurefrogmen.

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Sharks Bay Umbi Diving Village is a Bedouin-owned resort with stunning views and a lovely private beach. It is ideal for divers as everything is onsite including the resort's jetty, dive centre and house reef. The warm hospitality makes for a diving holiday like no other. There is an excellent seafood restaurent and beach bar onsite, and with the enormous diversity of the Sharm El Sheikh dive sites and the surrounding areas of the South Sinai, there really is something for every level of diver to enjoy.

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