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The Countdown has Commenced to OZTek2017

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OZTek 2017

OZTek is nearly upon us … and will unfold at Darling Harbour in Sydney, Autralia on 18-19 March. This show only comes around every two years and there’s no time to lose. Get your ticket today!

Aimed at everyone who dives, this event is a potent mix of information, education, entertainment and inspiration delivered over one weekend. Regardless of experience level, OZTek offers something for everyone.

Held at Darling Harbour’s brand new Exhibition Centre, Sydney’s newest premier event venue is in the heart of the city’s CBD, shopping and entertainment district and promises an action-packed weekend.

Beginning with a variety of informal functions on the Friday evening, the weekend activities continue with:

  • A full-scale Dive and Travel exhibition – a stand-alone event in its own right – catering to every level of diving interest and featuring everything divers require; from cameras to compressors, regulators to rebreathers, snorkels to scooters, facemasks to fins, home grown Australian destinations as well as exotic overseas dive resorts and great liveaboard trips. The world’s leading equipment brands, accessories and premier dive travel and training will all be on show at OZTek2017.
  • Two-days of presentations, seminars and workshops given by more than 40 of some of diving’s most respected identities, people who are tomorrow’s household names and whose individual exploits, achievements and knowledge of diving are second to none.
  • A ticketed event to be held on the evening of Saturday 18th March 2017, ‘On The Edge‘ will feature presentations by Explorer Club members Rod Macdonald, Paul Toomer and Jill Heinerth. Keeping alive the traits of vision, courage and tenacity that make diving exploration among the most compelling and relevant of high-risk enterprises, ‘On the Edge’ provides a spellbinding glimpse into the high-octane world of three of modern diving’s most accomplished and talented underwater explorers.
  • Discover the origins and adventures in Pushing the Envelope – a unique photographic exhibit celebrating the people, projects and technologies behind the ‘Technical Diving Revolution’ (1986-2000+). Pushing The Envelope will feature over 300 images, maps, tables and quotes from the early days of technical diving. A brief step back in time to appreciate the advancement of diving technology, training and techniques we take for granted today.
  • Enjoy the Georges Camera Photographic Exhibition displaying selected images from eminent underwater photographers as well as the winners of the OZTek2017 Photographic Competition, including the Nikon Dive Portfolio of the Year. The 2017 competition and exhibition – focusing on wrecks, caves and open categories with fabulous prizes to be won – will be on permanent display throughout the weekend and screened in the main theatre on Saturday afternoon when the category winners will be announced.
  • The weekend activities finish with the staging of the OZTek2017 Gala Awards Dinner. Held at The Aerial, UTS overlooking the inner cityscape, and following the Sunday evening close of the OZTek2017 Exhibition and Conference, this ticketed event includes a magnificent meal, unlimited beers, wines and soft drinks, guest speakers and the presentation of the OZTek2017Awards.  An opportunity for the entire diving community to relax, socialise and unwind, the OZTek Gala Awards Dinner marks the perfect finish to a memorable weekend.

OZTek2017 offers an inspirational journey into the entire world of diving adventure and excitement. Don’t miss it.

Find out more about OZTek2017 – check out the website at www.oztek.com.au.

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Introducing the Cinebags Dome Port Case CB74

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The CB74 Port Case is a heavy duty case to protect and carry your compact sized dome port. Designed to protect and transport 6″-8″ ports from Nauticam, Zen, Sea&Sea and similar sized ports.

The CB74 is made of a heavy duty tarpaulin fabric with padded sidewalls to protect your dome port in your dive luggage. The oversized zippers allow for quick easy access to the port pouch.

A mesh pouch is attached to flap can be used to store your spare port cover.


A small velcro pouch is located in the back compartment of the CB74 for small parts like spare o-rings, or o-ring grease.


The front of the CB74 has a neoprene carry handle to make transporting the port case a breeze. The opposite side has an area you can write your name and also label the pouch so it can be easily identified.

Features:

  • heavy duty tarpaulin fabric
  • padded sidewalls
  • oversized zippers
  • mesh pouch for accessories
  • mesh pouch to store port cover
  • neoperene carry handle

The CB74 Dome Port and other CineBags Underwater Products are available through the dedicated underwater dealer network. 

For more information visit the Cinebags website by clicking here.

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Dive Training Blogs

When is it a good day to dive?

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By Rick Peck

The standard answer is “It’s always a good day to dive.” The real question is: When is it a day we should not dive?

There are several factors that go into a decision for a dive day.

  • Weather
  • Waves
  • Tides (if applicable)
  • Physical condition
  • Mental condition
  • Water visibility

Weather

We would all like to dive in bright sunny conditions. Unfortunately, that doesn’t always happen. It is always a good idea to check the forecast before a dive day. The weather directly before a dive might be bright and sunny, but in some areas, thunderstorms roll in quickly. While it may be an interesting experience to see a lightning storm underwater with the strobe effect, we do have to come up sometime. A 30+ pound lightning rod strapped to your back makes for a very dangerous exit.

Wind is also a concern. Storms that roll in quickly can bring gust fronts that make for dangerous conditions. It could be flat and calm when you enter, and you may ascend after the dive into 5-6 foot chop with a dangerous exit onto the boat. Having a boat drop on your head or getting tangled in the ladder is not fun.

Waves and Tides

Shore diving in a coastal area makes waves a concern. Waves are generated by wind speed, duration and fetch. If there is a storm offshore you could be seeing big waves with very little wind in your area. Linked to the wave action is the tide. At some sites, waves tend to fizzle out at extreme high tide, making for easier entry and exits.

Tides can also affect your dive in an inlet. There is a popular dive site in my area that normally dives from a half-hour before high tide to a half-hour after high tide because of the current generated by the tidal change. The tidal currents can become so strong that an average diver can’t overcome them. The question is: does the tide change match the time you have available to dive? Your local dive shop should have recommendations on where and when is the best time to shore dive. As we learned in our Open Water class, local knowledge is the best.

Physical Condition

Are you healthy enough to dive? Do you have the physical conditioning to safely do the dive you are planning? Pushing your physical limits directly after a cold or allergy attack could lead to an ear injury or worse. If you have been sick, maybe you don’t have the energy reserves to rescue yourself or a buddy if required. The typical “Oh, I’ll be alright” could put not only you but your dive buddy at risk as well. Don’t let your ego write checks that your body can’t fulfill.

Mental Condition

You could compare diving to driving a car. We have all heard of distracted driving. If you are mentally upset or dealing with a great deal of stress, it might be prudent to evaluate whether it’s a good day to dive. Frustration and an urgency to get into the water to “relax” could mean you are skipping items on your buddy checks and self-checks. Unless you have the mental discipline to set these worries aside, it is probably better to dive another day.

Water Visibility

While there is a segment of the diving population that likes to “Muck Dive,” in general we prefer to see what is around us. One type of diving where visibility is important is drift diving. It is a two-fold problem, if you stay shallow enough to avoid obstructions, you can’t see anything. If you go deep enough to see the bottom, depending on the speed of the current, there is a possibility of being driven into a coral head or some other obstruction that you don’t see approaching. It is also much easier to become separated from your buddy. Remember to discuss and set a lost buddy protocol before the dive.

Summary

While it seems like all the stars and moon must align in order to safely dive, it’s really simple. Check the weather, check the tides (If applicable), do a self-assessment, and don’t be reluctant to cancel a dive if the conditions warrant it when you arrive at the dive site. A little planning and forethought will lead to a safe enjoyable dive. Always remember to dive within the limits of your training, conditioning, and skill set.


To find out more about International Training, visit www.tdisdi.com.

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Competitions

Explore the amazing triangle of Red Sea Reefs - The Brothers, Daedalus and Elphinstone on board the brand new liveaboard Big Blue.  With an option to add on a week at Roots Red Sea before or after. 

Strong currents and deep blue water are the catalysts that bring the pelagic species flocking to these reefs. The reefs themselves provide exquisite homes for a multitude of marine life.  The wafting soft corals are adorned with thousands of colourful fish. The gorgonian fans and hard corals provide magnificent back drops, all being patrolled by the reef’s predatory species.

£1475 per person based on double occupancy.  Soft all inclusive board basis, buffet meals with snacks, tea and coffee always available.  Add a week on at Roots Red Sea Resort before or after the liveaboard for just £725pp.  Flights and transfers are included.  See our brochure linked above for the full itinerary.

This trip will be hosted by The Scuba Place.  Come Dive with Us!

Call 020 3515 9955 or email john@thescubaplace.co.uk

www.thescubaplace.co.uk

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