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Aquatica announce the A1Dcx Mark II Housing for the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

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EOS-1D X

Aquatica has announced its new housing for Canon’s second generation of its most advanced action photography pro camera, the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II. With easy to reach controls, Aquatica’s new lens gear system and uncompromised viewing, this new housing puts the Canon 1D X MKII into the hands of photographers shooting in the world’s most demanding underwater environments.

Canon EOS-1D X Mark II Key Features

  • 20.2MP full-frame CMOS sensor
  • ISO 100–51,200, expandable to 409,600
  • 4K video at 60fps
  • Up to 120p frame rate at 1080p
  • 4K frame grab
  • 14fps/16 in LiveView mode in RAW or JPG
  • 2-inch, 1.62 million dot resolution touch-sensitive LCD monitor
  • 61-point High Density Reticular AF II system w/41 cross-type points
  • 216-zone, 360k pixel RGB/IR metering sensor
  • 30–1/8000 sec plus bulb; 1/250 sec X-sync
  • Fast 2.0 compatible
  • Dual CF Card slots
  • Built-in GPS
  • Magnesium alloy body, dust- and weather-sealed

ABOUT THE AQUATICA A1Dcx Mark II HOUSING

The Canon EOS-1D X MKII has a maximum of 14fps standard/16fps Live View burst rate and up to 170 RAW images per blast when using a Cfast card, as well as improved AF performance and 4K video capture, this camera is destined to be the camera of choice for sports photographers, wildlife photographers, and even for studio photography.

This new housing is no exception to Aquatica’s manufacture process as it is milled from a solid block of 6061 T6 aircraft grade aluminum. It is then black anodized and for further protection, a resistant, baked at high temperature, polyester electrostatic powder coat paint is added. This ensures that your investment will last a lifetime.

All video controls are designed for easy reach and smooth operation throughout the housing. This includes a next-generation lens gearing system with a redesigned housing pinion gear and a larger diameter lens gear selection, allowing for smoother transition while zooming/focusing in a video sequence. The Aquatica quick release tray delivers smooth and precise positioning of the camera in the housing and allows the user to insert and remove the camera using a simple push tab, allowing the camera to be removed from the back while keeping a lens and zoom gear attached.

The video record on/off control lever is perfectly located on the right side of the housing. This lever is easily controlled with the thumb using a slight forward motion. All push buttons are made from high quality type 304 stainless steel and operate smoothly for a natural feel and intuitive operation.

 

EOS-1D X

SURVEYOR MOISTURE AND VACUUM SENSOR, PUMP & VALVE INCLUDED

Aquatica’s A1Dcx MkII ships with their new atmospheric pressure sensitive circuitry and moisture detector as well as the valve and pump. Aquatica decided to have this add on as a standard feature on your housing to allow you to monitor the vacuum pressure inside the housing.

The moisture detection circuit is on constant guard duty, ready to inform you, by way of an audible and visual signal, of any infiltration, no matter how small. This advanced SURVEYOR circuit also integrates temperature compensation, preventing change in ambient temperature from affecting its accuracy. A few strokes of a pump will light up a green LED, giving you the confirmation that the housing sealing integrity is impeccable.

MORE ABOUT THE HOUSING’S UNIQUE FEATURES

The A1Dcx Mark II housing has three bulkhead access holes ready to accept external accessories such as Aquatica’s Remote trigger, their Water Wizard (an external radio transceiver housing) and third party external monitors and other accessories.

The A1Dcx Mark II model 20082-NK comes equipped with two classic Nikonos connectors of the newest type, these strobe connectors are easy field interchangeable in minutes, while the 20082-KM model is supplied with a time proven 5-pin Ikelite connector.

PROVEN AQUATICA PERFORMANCE

More than 30 years of expertise have helped craft this A1Dcx Mark II ergonomic design. It’s a design strongly influenced by working closely, and listening to the input of professional image makers from around the world. The result is an unparalleled attention to detail and expertly crafted solutions.

Viewing is through Aquatica’s own exceptional Galileo-type eye piece. This high quality and coated optical finder gives a bright and full view of the finder. The A1Dcx Mark II is also fully compatible with Aquatica’s accessory Aqua View 180, and Aqua View 45 finder. For those who are seeking the ultimate in still image viewing, these two enhanced Aqua View finders deliver second-to-none clarity, providing tack sharp corner to corner viewing for composing and critical focusing.

The A1Dcx Mark II also retains Aquatica’s trademark molded grips, the industry standard of comfort for the last 25 years. Lightweight and molded of one piece, they never come unglued or corrode. On top of both grips, threaded mounting holes are ready to accept the popular mounting bracket of Aquatica’s Technical Lighting Control-Delta 3 system as well as being compatible with most current strobes and lighting arms on the market. An extra mounting point for a focus/video light or other accessories is included on top of the housing and three additional mounting points are provided under the housing for various brackets, supports or tripods.

The A1Dcx Mark II housing belongs to one of the most established and comprehensive port and accessories system of the industry. The Aquatica port system, with its critically precise optical property, has been a stable platform on which thousands of photographers have relied on for more than 20 years to produces state of the art images.

The lightweight A1Dcx Mark II benefits from the finest material available in the metallurgic industry and is carefully crafted from a selected alloy of aircraft-grade aluminum. This housing still has the same standard 90m/328ft depth rating that can be factory upgraded to 130m/425ft depth rating on request. Its knurled knobs and oversized controls mean easy operation in all kinds of diving conditions.

 

EOS-1D X

Housing equipped with Aquatica’s 180 View Finder #20054

SPECIFICATIONS

Depth Rating & Dimension

  • 100m/328ft (upgradeable to 130m/426ft)
  • Dimensions: Height: 8,49’’ / Depth: 5,3’’
  • Width: No grips: 8,63’’ / With grips: 13,03’’
  • Weight (with grips attached): 8,5 lbs

Construction of shell

  • 6061 T6 Marine Grade aluminum
  • Anodized to MIL-A-8625 (type 2, Class 2 specification)
  • Powder coated with certified A.A.M.A. 2603-98 Polyester coating
  • Baked at 177c/350F (specification ASTM D2794

Mounting points for strobes arms, lighting fixtures and/or tripod

  • 5 standard ¼”-20 sized threaded holes, two on each hand grips and one centered on top of the housing
  • 3 standard ¼”-20 sized threaded holes located at the base of the housing
  • Standard features last line
  • 5 bulkhead access entry point for various accessories

Control shafts and push pins

  • Type 304 marine grade Stainless steel
  • All shaft double sealed with double O-rings
  • All push pins sealed with Quad Rings

Standard features

  • Ergonomically optimized for diving conditions
  • Oversized knurled controls knobs
  • Sturdy comfortable grips
  • Extended shutter release
  • Port lock mechanism
  • Lens release mechanism
  • Standard high quality Galileo Optical Eye piece
  • Dual sacrificial anodes (front and rear mounted)
  • 5 accessory bulkhead entry points
  • Surveyor Moisture and vacuum sensor, pump & valve
  • Form fitting Grips (2x)

RETAIL PRICE AT $4,849.00 USD

For more information visit www.aquatica.ca.

Nick and Caroline (Frogfish Photography) are a married couple of conservation driven underwater photo-journalists and authors. Both have honours degrees from Manchester University, in Environmental Biology and Biology respectively, with Nick being a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, a former high school science teacher with a DipEd in Teaching Studies. Caroline has an MSc in Animal Behaviour specializing in Caribbean Ecology. They are multiple award-winning photographers and along with 4 published books, feature regularly in the diving, wildlife and international press They are the Underwater Photography and Deputy Editors at Scubaverse and Dive Travel Adventures. Winners of the Caribbean Tourism Organization Photo-journalist of the Year for a feature on Shark Diving in The Bahamas, and they have been placed in every year they have entered. Nick and Caroline regularly use their free time to visit schools, both in the UK and on their travels, to discuss the important issues of marine conservation, sharks and plastic pollution. They are ambassadors for Sharks4Kids and founders of SeaStraw. They are Dive Ambassadors for The Islands of The Bahamas and are supported by Mares, Paralenz, Nauticam and Olympus. To find out more visit www.frogfishphotography.com

News

Introducing the Cinebags Dome Port Case CB74

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The CB74 Port Case is a heavy duty case to protect and carry your compact sized dome port. Designed to protect and transport 6″-8″ ports from Nauticam, Zen, Sea&Sea and similar sized ports.

The CB74 is made of a heavy duty tarpaulin fabric with padded sidewalls to protect your dome port in your dive luggage. The oversized zippers allow for quick easy access to the port pouch.

A mesh pouch is attached to flap can be used to store your spare port cover.


A small velcro pouch is located in the back compartment of the CB74 for small parts like spare o-rings, or o-ring grease.


The front of the CB74 has a neoprene carry handle to make transporting the port case a breeze. The opposite side has an area you can write your name and also label the pouch so it can be easily identified.

Features:

  • heavy duty tarpaulin fabric
  • padded sidewalls
  • oversized zippers
  • mesh pouch for accessories
  • mesh pouch to store port cover
  • neoperene carry handle

The CB74 Dome Port and other CineBags Underwater Products are available through the dedicated underwater dealer network. 

For more information visit the Cinebags website by clicking here.

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Dive Training Blogs

When is it a good day to dive?

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By Rick Peck

The standard answer is “It’s always a good day to dive.” The real question is: When is it a day we should not dive?

There are several factors that go into a decision for a dive day.

  • Weather
  • Waves
  • Tides (if applicable)
  • Physical condition
  • Mental condition
  • Water visibility

Weather

We would all like to dive in bright sunny conditions. Unfortunately, that doesn’t always happen. It is always a good idea to check the forecast before a dive day. The weather directly before a dive might be bright and sunny, but in some areas, thunderstorms roll in quickly. While it may be an interesting experience to see a lightning storm underwater with the strobe effect, we do have to come up sometime. A 30+ pound lightning rod strapped to your back makes for a very dangerous exit.

Wind is also a concern. Storms that roll in quickly can bring gust fronts that make for dangerous conditions. It could be flat and calm when you enter, and you may ascend after the dive into 5-6 foot chop with a dangerous exit onto the boat. Having a boat drop on your head or getting tangled in the ladder is not fun.

Waves and Tides

Shore diving in a coastal area makes waves a concern. Waves are generated by wind speed, duration and fetch. If there is a storm offshore you could be seeing big waves with very little wind in your area. Linked to the wave action is the tide. At some sites, waves tend to fizzle out at extreme high tide, making for easier entry and exits.

Tides can also affect your dive in an inlet. There is a popular dive site in my area that normally dives from a half-hour before high tide to a half-hour after high tide because of the current generated by the tidal change. The tidal currents can become so strong that an average diver can’t overcome them. The question is: does the tide change match the time you have available to dive? Your local dive shop should have recommendations on where and when is the best time to shore dive. As we learned in our Open Water class, local knowledge is the best.

Physical Condition

Are you healthy enough to dive? Do you have the physical conditioning to safely do the dive you are planning? Pushing your physical limits directly after a cold or allergy attack could lead to an ear injury or worse. If you have been sick, maybe you don’t have the energy reserves to rescue yourself or a buddy if required. The typical “Oh, I’ll be alright” could put not only you but your dive buddy at risk as well. Don’t let your ego write checks that your body can’t fulfill.

Mental Condition

You could compare diving to driving a car. We have all heard of distracted driving. If you are mentally upset or dealing with a great deal of stress, it might be prudent to evaluate whether it’s a good day to dive. Frustration and an urgency to get into the water to “relax” could mean you are skipping items on your buddy checks and self-checks. Unless you have the mental discipline to set these worries aside, it is probably better to dive another day.

Water Visibility

While there is a segment of the diving population that likes to “Muck Dive,” in general we prefer to see what is around us. One type of diving where visibility is important is drift diving. It is a two-fold problem, if you stay shallow enough to avoid obstructions, you can’t see anything. If you go deep enough to see the bottom, depending on the speed of the current, there is a possibility of being driven into a coral head or some other obstruction that you don’t see approaching. It is also much easier to become separated from your buddy. Remember to discuss and set a lost buddy protocol before the dive.

Summary

While it seems like all the stars and moon must align in order to safely dive, it’s really simple. Check the weather, check the tides (If applicable), do a self-assessment, and don’t be reluctant to cancel a dive if the conditions warrant it when you arrive at the dive site. A little planning and forethought will lead to a safe enjoyable dive. Always remember to dive within the limits of your training, conditioning, and skill set.


To find out more about International Training, visit www.tdisdi.com.

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Explore the amazing triangle of Red Sea Reefs - The Brothers, Daedalus and Elphinstone on board the brand new liveaboard Big Blue.  With an option to add on a week at Roots Red Sea before or after. 

Strong currents and deep blue water are the catalysts that bring the pelagic species flocking to these reefs. The reefs themselves provide exquisite homes for a multitude of marine life.  The wafting soft corals are adorned with thousands of colourful fish. The gorgonian fans and hard corals provide magnificent back drops, all being patrolled by the reef’s predatory species.

£1475 per person based on double occupancy.  Soft all inclusive board basis, buffet meals with snacks, tea and coffee always available.  Add a week on at Roots Red Sea Resort before or after the liveaboard for just £725pp.  Flights and transfers are included.  See our brochure linked above for the full itinerary.

This trip will be hosted by The Scuba Place.  Come Dive with Us!

Call 020 3515 9955 or email john@thescubaplace.co.uk

www.thescubaplace.co.uk

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